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5X Top Writer | Canadian Researcher | Aspiring Therapist | Writing about mental health, psychology, technology, etc. https://linktr.ee/SynthiaS

Their motives are easier to detect online.

Narcissists are easier to detect online — Photo by Mentatdgt from Pexels

When you’re watching a TV series, such as a soap opera or a psychological thriller, it's easy to spot the narcissist. For example, perhaps the protagonist or antagonist of your favourite TV series is riddled with intelligence, sexual appeal, and arrogance.

They surround themselves around the very people who enable those behaviours but they are also incredibly insensitive to the emotional needs of the other characters around them.

Even so, perhaps we might find ourselves cheering for these fictional narcissists because they have such an immense physical, sexual, and/or intellectual appeal. …


There is a biological underpinning to that collective gasp or applause.

Photo by Pavel Danilyuk from Pexels

Our caveman ancestors definitely shared many stories and songs. Tales were probably told by a roaring fire, accompanied by song, drink, and dance. Remarkable hand paintings likely adorned the walls, while people hummed, nodded their heads, and swayed their bodies.

Perhaps they all engaged in an impromptu group dance as well, where the movements of multiple people seemed to magically flow with the tune of the music. They didn’t practice, they just did this automatically.

By the end of these social performances, each person probably felt that they shared something special and sacred with one another. Perhaps they felt enlightened.


Canadian Researcher & Writer | MA in Counselling Psychology | Aspiring Therapist | Crisis Responder

Photo of the writer Synthia when she graduated from her H. BSc. in Biopsychology at a Canadian university.

Hello Medium writers,

My name is Synthia and I’m a female in her twenties who is born and raised in Canada. My cultural ancestry is Sri Lankan. I can speak in English and have some proficiency in French as well.

At the time of publishing, I was doing my second rodeo of graduate school, particularly in the field of counselling psychology. Recently, I have graduated from this program and I have plans to potentially become a therapist in the future.

For a bit of context, I did my Honours Bachelor of Science in Biopsychology and my first Master’s degree in…


However, we must be careful about implicit judgements.

Photo by Eren Li from Pexels

In our daily interactions, we are cognitive misers. This means we often seek out reliable, sufficient, and quick results in our daily interactions. We do this because we are not robots, and cannot process every single permutation surrounding every single multifaceted circumstance.

As such, we make quick and implicit decisions surrounding the people in our daily lives — and we often don’t realize that we’re actively doing it.

When we take a quick jog around the neighbourhood and go out about our day, we may make some pretty sudden judgements. …


They’re so catchy and promote collective well-being.

Photo by Levent Simsek from Pexels

With the rise of increasingly immersive social media experiences, such as TikTok, there’s been a resurgence and popularity in sea shanties.

Back in 2020, Nathan Evans, a 26-year-old Scottish postman uploaded a video of himself singing a shanty called “Soon May the Wellerman Come” and many others created their own covers, with additional instruments, ensembles, pitches, and harmonies.

Chiming in on the fun, what was once seen as an old-fashioned tradition among sailors — now became a timeless and impactful piece for the younger generations.

A Life of Its Own

While this trend of singing sea shanties wasn’t just limited to the vast corners of…


It even beats hanging out by the lake.

Trees are truly magical — Photo by Allan Mas from Pexels

As environmentalists may tell you, trees purify our air and provide us with an ample supply of fresh oxygen. They absorb carbon dioxide, making them an important part of our planet’s climate regulation.

While we have the ability to influence our health through mental and physical means, an epidemiological study published in Nature Sustainability suggests that children between the ages of nine to fifteen experience many cognitive benefits after spending a lot of time around trees.

To clarify, cognitive benefits can include (but are not limited to):

  • Lower stress
  • Increased memory
  • Sustained attention
  • Renewed happiness
  • More energy

The Research

This specific study…


Your trauma is real and valid, and you deserve to be taken seriously.

Photo by MART PRODUCTION from Pexels

As an aspiring therapist and crisis responder, I’ve seen a lot of people discount the experiences that they have been through — despite going through a lot of distressing stuff.

You’ve probably seen countless articles highlighting the dangers of gaslighting and how to potentially evade such people. Here, I’m going to highlight instances where we have inadvertently done the same to ourselves.

Yes, it’s a thing and yes, we should be mindful of it in case it happens to us.

A Brief Recap

To bring everyone up to speed, gaslighting is a form of emotional abuse that relies on subtle and escalating manipulation…


SUSTAINABILITY

With no prior training, he became their top electrical engineer.

Photo by Burak Kebapci from Pexels

Colrerd Nkosi is no ordinary innovator.

With no electrical engineering or carpentry experience, and possessing limited items such as a bicycle, and a corn-shelling machine motor, Colrerd has been lighting homes for his neighbours in the town of Mzimba.

The Significance of His Act

Mzimba is located in Malawi, a landlocked country in Southeastern Africa. Malawi only provides electricity to 11% of its entire population and is one of the least electrified countries globally.

Colrerd had to do a lot of experimenting to make sure that his experiment would work. …


Let’s make sense of the modern research surrounding rudeness.

Photo by Maria Eduarda Loura Magalhães from Pexels

There’s a fairly huge chance that you’ve met someone who is particularly mean. No matter what you do, they always have something rude to say. Yet, you can’t escape their clutches all the time either — maybe because they are your parent, cousin, or boss, and you have to maintain appearances for the time being.

When you tread around these sorts of people, we can’t help but wonder why they are the way that they are. I mean, surrounding ourselves around these sorts of people wastes a lot of our limited energy and time.

According to a study conducted at…


I’m not even mad.

Photo by Happy Pixels from Pexels

As the days continue to get darker outside, I’ve found myself increasingly consumed by many real-life things. These real-life things, like increased adulthood responsibilities, have taken me to new places where I am spending less and less time online.

From August of last year all the way to August of this year, I managed to write at least one story per day (more or less) despite the many commitments that I also needed to tackle in real life.

This month, I’m planning to scale back and be more strategic with my online writing. …

Synthia Stark

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